Enrique De La Uz, Mujer Enfangada (Woman Covered in Mud), 2002, silver gelatin print,12 x 16".

Lisette Solorzano, Ferro Carril 2, (Iron Rail 2), 2002, ultrachrome archival print, 12 x 17".

Cuban Photography, 1970-2004 and the Human Element

Pedro Abascal, Documentos Personales 14, 1996-2002, silver gelatin print, 8 x 12".

Pedro Abascal, Documentos Personales 8, 1996-2002, silver gelatin print, 8 x 12".

Pedro Abascal, Documentos Personales 7, 1996-2002, silver gelatin print, 8 x 12".

 

Cara and Cabezas Contemporary
1714 Holmes Street
Kansas City
816.332.6239
Cuba: Vivid Shadows / Obscure Illuminations, Photographs
by Pedro Abascal, Lissette Solorzano,
and Enrique de la Uz

September 9-October 23, 2011

Cuba: Vivid Shadows / Obscure Illuminations , features seminal photographs by Cuban photographers Pedro Abascal, Lissette Solorzano, and Enrique de la Uz made between 1970 and 2004.

This important selection of photographs depicts many of the iconographic elements for which Cuban photography is sometimes first known. At the same time, these images demonstrate several of its most vibrant contemporary interpretations. The images, born from a modern visual tradition depicting Cuba’s social context, also possess a photographic relevance integral to the Cuban culture, its revolution, and the way in which the country stands at the threshold of change. 

Charles Anselmo, the photographer who first culled this group of images for exhibition in the United States writes, “The architecture, the interiors, and the many neighborhood districts all engender the ambivalences of the past and the way in which the city is bestrewn with the many signs of urban memory. Arrested in time and bathed in tropical light, Havana is steeped in these talismans and the evocative beauty of decay.” 

In addition to highlighting the cityscape of Havana, each photograph in the exhibition contains the human or human form. Through the poetic vision of these image-makers, the subjects of these photographs transcend the physical acts in which they have been captured to become symbols of a cultural identity. As the title suggests, the more that these photographs reveal and unveil to a viewer, the stronger the sense of mystery and unknown is conjured.

Enrique De La Uz, No Hay Otra Manera de Hacer la Zafra 4 and 5 (There is no Other Way to Harvest the Cane 4), 1970, silver gelatin print, 12 x 17".

Lisette Solorzano, Made in Cuba 1, 1990-2007, ultrachrome archival print, 12 x 17".

Enrique De La Uz, Hombre tatuado (Tattooed Man), 2003, silver gelatin print, 9 x 14".